Radio Free Maine
presents

Utah Phillips
Singing Songs and Telling Stories
Upon receiving the annual "Joe Hill" Award from the
Labor Heritage Foundation at the
Great Labor Arts Exchange

As Joe Glazer, Chairman of the LHF, noted, this was
the first time that the IWW and the AFL-CIO had gotten
together in over a century, and it was to honor the
Golden Voice of the Great Southwest.
Accompanied by his daughter Morgan, and nursing a
bandaged right hand, Utah Phillips accepted the "Joe
Hill" award and entertained labor musicians with a
rare acapella performance for over an hour.
Utah Phillips has been described as a true eclectic,
archivist, historian, activist, philosopher, hobo,
tramp, member of the IWW, and just about everything in
between.  Utah's memory contains a wide ranging wealth
of lore, which he lets us romp through by way of his
shows and recordings.  Utah Phillips is a nationally
known folk artist, singer/story teller, Grammy Award
Nominee for his work with Ani Difranco, and hosts his
own weekly radio show - Loafer's Glory: The Hobo
Jungle of the Mind.

Recorded by Roger Leisner on June 21, 2004 at the
Great Labor Arts Exchange held at the George Meany 
AFL-CIO Labor Center in Silver Spring, Maryland.
   
Available on audiotape cassette for $11.00,
audio CD for $12.50, VHS videotape for $20.00
and DVD video for $20.00.

Please make check payable to Roger Leisner and mail to
Radio Free Maine
P.O. Box 2705
Augusta, Maine  04338


October 18, 2003

The Other September 11: Chile, Terrorism, and U.S. Foreign Policy

Featuring a message from Isabel Allende and talks by Chappell Lawson, Elizabeth Garrels, Sergio Reyes and Noam Chomsky

On September 11, 1973, the democratically elected government of Salvador Allende in Chile was overthrown by a U.S.-supported military coup and a brutal dictatorship under General Pinochet was installed.

What can we learn about democracy and terrorism by looking back at this event and the actions that followed it?

Tape #1 (A/V) Starts with a message from ISABEL ALLENDE, one of Latin America's foremost writers. After her uncle, Salvador Allende, the President of Chile, was murdered in the 1973 military coup, she went into exile. Her first novel, "The House of the Spirits, was based on her family experience. The message is read by her niece, Diana Huidobro.

Next is CHAPPELL LAWSON, who served in the Clinton White House as N.S.C. Director of Inter-American Affairs, reviews the history of U.S. policy and actions in Latin America. Presently, he is a professor of political science at M.I.T. specializing in Latin American politics and U.S. foreign policy.

Next,ELIZABETH GARRELS speaks about her experiences living and working in Caracas in the 1970s as a member of the Venezuelan Committee of Solidarity with Chile. Presently, she is the head of the Foreign Languages and Literature at M.I.T. specializing in Hispanic American literature from the early 19th century to the present.

At the end, SERGIO REYES, an activist, musician, and former political prisoner, addresses current social, economic, and human-rights concerns in Chile, and the role of the our government in Chilean internal affairs. A student leader in Chile during the Allende Presidency, he was imprisoned after the military coup for four years on Dawson Island, a concentration camp near the southern tip of Chile. 30 years on, he is organizing a reunion of those who were imprisoned with him.

Tape #2 (A/V) features NOAM CHOMSKY speaking on terrorism and U.S. foreign policy, in Chile and elsewhere. Chomsky speaks for forty minutes and answers questions from the audience for over an hour.

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the MIT Western Hemisphere Project Teach-In at M.I.T. in Cambridge, MA

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 29, 2003

NOAM CHOMSKY

IRAQ AND THE U.S. IMPERIAL GRAND STRATEGY

Unique among the world's political commentators, Noam Chomsky ranks with Marx, Shakespeare and the Bible as one of the 10 most quoted sources in the humanities - and is the only living writer among them.

In this talk, Noam Chomsky addresses the Iraq invasion in the global context: the motives of the war planners; the forces behind them, notably the Project for the New American Century; what sort of government is likely to emerge in Iraq; implications for NATO and the EU; and implications for the peace movement.

It was a great night for Chomsky and the peace/justice advocates of Arlington and Lexington. About 800 people were jammed into the sanctuary where Chomsky spoke and answered questions for nearly two hours, while downstairs over 400 people people watched via video feed. Numerous others found they could not get in, so they stood the entire time outside open windows. You can see them in the RFM video. With this talk being the last one this year until sometime in September, one could see that Chomsky was tired from the recent touring and speaking. But, as usual, he dazzled the audience with what could be described as a foreign policy briefing by a government-in-exile Secretary of State.

This forum is part of an on-going community education series co-sponsored by Arlington United for Justice with Peace (UJP) and Lexington Peace and Justice Committee

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the Pleasant Street Congregational Church in Arlington, MA

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



August 1, 2003

FREDRIC R. JAMESON

Cinema and History in the Balkans

Professor Fredric R. Jameson is a seminal figure in philosophy and literary studies, and has published over a dozen books and 100 articles during a teaching career that spans Harvard, Yale, the University of California and Duke. His work has received two Guggenheims, honors from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Lowell Award from the Modern Language Association of America. Jameson is the William A. Lane, Jr. Professor of Comparative Literature, Professor of Romance Studies, Chair of the Program in Literature and Theory, and Director for the Center for Critical Theory at Duke University.

In this talk, Professor Jameson does not shy away from pointing out that the break-up of Yugoslavia was more the fault of international monetary policies than ethnic differences. With a strong autonomous republic/federal system of government and worker managed industries, Jameson notes that Yugoslavia was the first victim of economic globalization. A Mainer from Orono told me that Jameson is a prominent Marxist literary critic, and I would be reading him if I was taking an english or literature course in college today

This lecture is part of the university's new (in its second year) Graduate Certificate Program in Theory, Literature and Culture. For more information about this program, please contact Dominique Bartels Administrative Associate University of Southern Maine Department of English P.O. Box 9300 Portland, Maine 04104-9300 email: bartels@usm.maine.edu

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the University of Southern Maine in Portland.



August 14, 2003

ALEX GRAB

Understanding the Palestinian/Israeli Conflict

Professor Alex Grab was born and raised in Israel, served in the Israeli military, received a PhD from UCLA in 1980 and currently teaches European and Middle Eastern History at the University of Maine at Orono.

Expressing frustration and angst, Professor Grab discusses the history of Middle East conflicts and the current US proposed road map for peace. Citing the Israeli settlements in the West Bank and the construction of "the wall", Professor Grab argues that Israel and its partner, the U.S., are the real roadblocks to peace in the Middle East. Professor Grab contends that peace and justice will never occur until the occupation of Palestine ends.

It was a treat to hear an Israeli historian deliver a "Howard Zinn" analysis of the Palestinian/Israeli conflict.

Sponsored by the Peace and Justice Committee of Waldo County and the Social Justice Committee of the U-U Church

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Belfast, Maine

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



July 31, 2003

ROBERT MEEROPOL, FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Executions in the Family: 50 Years Later

Robert Meeropol is the younger son of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. In 1953, when he was six years old, the United States Government executed his parents for "conspiring to steal the secret of the atomic bomb." For 30 years he has been a progressive activist, author and speaker. In the 1970's he and his brother, Michael, successfully sued the FBI and CIA to force the release of 300,000 previously secret documents about their parents. He earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, graduated from law school in 1985 and was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar. In 1990, after leaving private practice, Robert founded the Rosenberg Fund for Children and now serves as its Executive Director. The RFC provides for the educational and emotional needs of both targeted activist youth and children in this country whose parents have been harassed, injured, jailed, lost jobs or died in the course of their progressive activities. On the 50th anniversary of his parent's executions, Robert's memoir, AN EXECUTION IN THE FAMILY, was published by St. Martin's Press. The book details his political and personal odyssey from Rosenberg son to prominent political activist. Howard Zinn calls it a "personal, anguished search for truth" and Michael Moore says AN EXECUTION IN THE FAMILY is, "Inspirational . . . moving . . . engaging . . . should be required reading."

Robert and Ellen Meeropol with their two daughters, Rachel and Jennifer, plus friends of the family commemorate the 50th anniversary of the execution of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. The evening program consists of a re-enactment of the "Celebrate the Children of Resistance" performed at City Center in New York City on June 19, 2003, and readings by Robert Meeropol from his new political memoir "An Execution in the Family - One Son's Journey", published by St. Martin's Press. During the Q&A; period, Robert Meeropol addresses the question of his parent's guilt or innocence and discusses the work of the Rosenberg Fund for Children. For information, go to the web site: www.rfc.org

Sponsored by the World Fellowship Center in Conway, NH Web Site www.worldfellowship.org

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the World Fellowship Center in Conway, NH

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



July 27, 2003 (only available on VHS video)

FELICE YESKEL

The Growing Divide: Inequality and

the Roots of Economic Insecurity

Director of the UMass Stonewall Center and co-founder of United for a Fair Economy comes from a working class Jewish family from New York City's lower-east side. Felice is also a founder and Co-Director of Diversity Works, Inc. an organization of social justice educators that provides training and consulting on issues of diversity and multiculturalism. She has led hundreds of workshops across the country about economic inequality and about healing divisions among Americans of different class backgrounds, races, genders and sexual orientations. She is the co-author of Economic Apartheid in America, published by The New Press in 2000.

Excellent talk and workshop concerning the massive wealth shift of the past 25 years and what we can do to reverse the growing gap between the rich and the working poor.

Sponsored by the World Fellowship Center Web Site www.worldfellowship.org

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the World Fellowship Center in Conway, NH

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



June 7, 2003

NANCY ALEXANDER

Stealing the Heart of the Democratic Process:

The Corporate Gambit to Control Essential Services

Nancy Alexander is founder and Director of the Citizens� Network on Essential Services (CNES), which supports citizens� groups around the world that seek to influence policy decisions about key services that affect their lives, including water, electricity, education, and health care. Before founding CNES in 1998, Alexander directed the Government Relations Department and the Development Bank Watchers� Project at Bread for the World in Washington, D.C. Previously, from 1984 to 1991, she worked as Legislative Advocate for the Friends (Quaker) Committee on National Legislation, lobbying the U.S. Congress on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the role of the U.S. in the United Nations, and U.S. military intervention in the developing world. In the early 1980s, Alexander worked as a Senior Associate for the Center for Policy Negotiations in Boston where she negotiated conflicts relating to disposal of low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, and the regulation of small-scale power production systems (cogeneration, wind, solar). Previously, she worked as a Legislative Assistant to a member of the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington, D.C. working on domestic social policy. Her degrees are from Duke University (psychology) and Harvard University (Ethics and Public Policy).

If your public water supply is privatized, it will be against the law to collect rainwater? Water. Health care. Energy. Education. Such services are human rights; they are also vast and growing markets that represent the next frontier for corporate-led globalization. Corporate campaigns to privatize services are striking at the heart of democratic process. At home and abroad, these campaigns threaten the �social contract� between a state and its citizens. A �social contract� enables citizens to hold the state accountable for meeting their basic needs, including those services essential for sustaining health, livelihoods and human dignity. Nancy Alexander describes the ways in which the privatization juggernaut is moving; the nature of the political and commercial forces driving the change; the roles of the international institutions (The World Trade Organization, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund); actual/potential impacts of the juggernaut; the timeline for influencing the juggernaut in various arenas; and opportunities for education and coalition-building.

Sponsored by CONA - Citizens Offering New Alternatives

Recorded by Roger Leisner at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in Newcastle, Maine

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 28, 2003

NASEER H. ARURI

Dishonest Broker:

The U.S. Role in Israel and Palestine

Chancellor Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. His many publications include Occupation: Israel Over Palestine (1983), The Obstruction of Peace: The U.S., Israel and the Palestinians (1995) and Palestinian Refugees: The Right of Return (Pluto, 2001). He was a member of the Board of Directors of Human Rights Watch/Middle East, 1990-1992, and a three-term member of the Board of Directors of Amnesty International, USA,1984-1990.

Naseer H. Aruri dismantles the many myths about the failed Middle East "peace process" in Dishonest Broker. Aruri analyzes the evolving relationship between the United States and the two protagonists - the Palestinians and Israel - and argues that the U.S. government has allowed Israel to violate international law to maintain its illegal occupation, while Palestinians continue to be denied their fundamental right to self-determination and justice. "Dishonest Broker: The U.S. Role in Israel and Palestine" is the title of Aruri's new book published by Southend Press. Web Site www.southendpress.org

Sponsored by REVOLUTION BOOKS 1156 Mass. Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138 revbooks@angelfire.com

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the First Parish Unitarian Church in Cambridge, MA

Recorded on Hi8 Digital


Naseer H. Aruri Chancellor Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth and author of Dishonest Broker: The US Role in Israel and Palestine speaking on

Dishonest Broker: The US Role in Israel and Palestine

Naseer H. Aruri dismantles the many myths about the failed Middle East "peace process" in Dishonest Broker. Aruri analyzes the evolving relationship between the United States and the two protagonists - the Palestinians and Israel - and argues that the U.S. government has allowed Israel to violate international law to maintain its illegal occupation, while Palestinians continue to be denied their fundamental right to self-determination and justice.

Sponsored by REVOLUTION BOOKS 1156 Mass. Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138 revbooks@angelfire.com Recorded by Roger Leisner on May 28, 2003 at the First Parish Unitarian Church in Cambridge, MA



May 23, 2003

JONATHAN SCHELL

BRIAN CORR

CYNTHIA PETERS

NIKIL AZIZ

People's Power and Preventing War

Jonathan Schell has written numerous books on defense and disarmament, including The Fate of the Earth The Village of Ben Suc The Military Half The Time of Illusion and his most recent book: The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence and the Will of the People published by Metropolitan Books, Henry Holt & Company. Schell is a regular contributor to Harper�s, Foreign Affairs and The Nation. He has taught at Yale, Princeton and Wesleyan, and is a fellow at the Nation Institute and Harvard�s Kennedy School of Government.

Jonathan Schell's talk was followed by perspectives from long time community-based organizers and activists. The respondents included Brian Corr: Northeast Action, National Chair of Peace Action and Co-clerk for the New England American Friends Service Committee Executive Committee. Cynthia Peters: Service Employees International Union (SEIU) local 285, Jamaica Plains Action Network and a frequent contributor to ZNET. Nikil Aziz: Political Research Associates.

Tracing the relentless expansion of violence to its culmination in nuclear stalemate, Schell uncovers a simultaneous but little-noted history of nonviolent action at every level of political life. His historical journey turns up seeds of nonviolence even in the bloody revolutions of America, France and Russia, as well as in the people�s wars of China and Vietnam. Schell's investigations into the great nonviolent events of modern times�from Gandhi�s independence movement in India to the explosion of civic activity that brought about the surprising collapse of the Soviet Union�suggest foundations of an entirely new kind on which to construct an enduring peace. As Schell makes clear, all-out war, with its risk of human extinction, must cease to play the role of final arbiter. The Unconquerable World is a bold lecture of global significance; far from being utopian, it offers the only realistic hope of safety.

Sponsored by New England American Friends Service Committee, United for Justice with Peace and Massachusetts Peace Action. Endorsed by the Coalition For a Strong United Nations.

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the Paulist Center in Boston, Massachusetts.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



April 14, 2003

NAWAL EL SAADAWI and SHERIF YOUSSEF HETATA

Creativity, Politics and Gender

Nawal El Saadawi is a novelist, a psychiatrist and a writer who is well known both in the Arab countries and in many other parts of the world. Her novels and her books on the situation of women in Egyptian and Arab society have had a deep effect on successive generations of young women over the last three decades. As a result of her literary and scientific writings she has had to face numerous difficulties and even dangers in her life. In 1972 she lost her job in the Egyptian government. The magazine, Health, which she had founded and editted for more than three years was closed down. In 1981 President Sadat put her in prison. She was released one month after his assassination. Today her name figures on the one of the death lists issued by some fanatical terrorist organizations. This list was also publicized in a neighboring Arab country and in cassettes which are widely distributed all over the country. On June 15, 1991, the government issued a decree which closed down the Arab Women's Solidarity Association over which she presides and hand over its funds to the Association called Women in Islam. Six months before this decree the government closed down the magazine, Noon, published by the Association. She was Editor in Chief of this Magazine. Nawal El Saadawi has been awarded several national and international literary prizes, and has lectured in many universities and participated in many international and national conferences. Her works have been translated into over 30 languages all over the world, and some of them are taught in a number of university colleges in different countries.

Sherif Youssef Hetata is a novelist and medical doctor. He is married to Nawal El Saadawi and has two children. He occupied various posts and functions since he graduated from the medical college with honors in 1946. These included a period of eight years with the International Labour Organization in Asia, then in Africa. During that period he was Head of a Team of Experts on Population and Migration. He has written on many subjects including travel, politics and health, but since 1968 has devoted himself to novels. He has translated some of his own works as well as some of the works of Nawal El Saadawi into English. He was Assistant Editor of the magazine, Health, in the early 1970s and of the feminist magazine, Noon, in the early nineties. In Egypt he was a member of the Board of the Medical Syndicate and participated in founding the Association for Health Education in 1969, and the Arab Women's Solidarity Association in 1982. He speaks and writes Arabic, English and French fluently. He worked for nine years in the Egyptian government service. First in the Ministry of Health planning and organizing primary health care services in rural areas, then in the planning department of the public sector drug industry, and lastly in the Supreme Council for Population and Family Planning. During the last period he attended several regional conferences on population and migration, spent three months at Chicago University in an exchange program, and participated in negotiations with the World Bank. Half of his period with the ILO was spent in Asia and the other half in Africa. In Asia he was based in New Delhi and was responsible for developing projects on population and migration with the concerned government authorities in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. He travelled extensively especially in India where he visited most of the states. He worked closely with high level government officials, parliamentarians, university professors, research institutes, political parties, trade unions and non-governmental organization. During this period he also travelled to Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and the Philippines. Many of these travels and experiences are reflected in his book, "The Way of Salt and Love." During this period ten projects related to population and migration were developed, and assisted by his office in the ILO. In Africa he was based in Addis Ababa and travelled extensively in Saharan Africa where he visited twelve countries in both the Eastern, Southern and Western parts of the continent. He worked for several years at the head of a task force in the Egyptian Medical Syndicate on policies and plans related to primary health care and health insurance and his professional experience in this area was reflected in his book, "Health and Development." (Dar El Maaref Publishing House, 1968).

For more information, go to the web site www.nawalsaadawi.net

What are some of the differences between male and female writers in regard to obstacles, rewards and perceptions? These two academic activists discuss and share their points of view in this stimulating and controversial lecture.

Sponsored by the Women Studies Program and the Philosphy Department of the University of Southern Maine in Portland

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the University of Southern Maine in Portland

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 18,2003

KYLE HENCE and LAWRENCE BRITT

RETHINKING 9/11 - Part 1 of 2

A Citizens' Inquiry into September 11th, the Corporate Coup and what has befallen our liberty and democracy

Kyle Hence: Associate Producer of the film "Aftermath: Unanswered Questions from 9/11" and co-founder of unansweredquestions.org and 911citizenswatch.org speaks after the showing of the film "Aftermath", plus there is an extended question and answer session. Lawrence Britt: Poli-sci novelist/historian speaks on the 14 common symptoms of fascism and diagnosing the body politic at home. For the purpose of this perspective, Britt considers the following regimes: Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Franco's Spain, Salazar's Portugal, Papadopoulos's Greece, Pinochet's Chile, and Suharto's Indonesia. They constitute a mixed bag of national identities, cultures, developmental levels, and history, but they all followed the fascist or protofascist model in obtaining, expanding and maintaining power. Further, all these regimes have been overthrown, so a more or less complete picture of their basic characteristics and abuses is possible.

Over 350 patriots gathered on a beautiful summer day in Maine to inform themselves of the unreported developments concerning 911 and to demand that their government investigate the events leading up to 911.

Sponsored by Big Medicine Productions, 911citizenswatch.org, "Bring Democracy Now! to Maine" Campaign, Maine Indy Media Center, Peace Action Maine and Seacoast Alliance for Democracy.

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the Atlantic Hall in Cape Porpoise, Kennebunkport, Maine.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 18,2003

DORIS HADDOCK aka GRANNY D and CATHERINE AUSTIN FITTS

RETHINKING 9/11 - Part 2 of 2

A Citizens' Inquiry into September 11th, the Corporate Coup and what has befallen our liberty and democracy

Doris "Granny D" Haddock: Legendary populist orator/campaign finance reform crusader who walked across America for campaign finance reform speaks on recognizing and reversing the corporate coup.

Ethan Miller sings Songs of Joy and Resistance

Catherine Austin Fitts: Asst Sec of HUD under Bush #1 and Clinton who blew the whistle on the missing hundreds of billions in their Lockheed-Martin managed accounting system speaks on some shortcuts to abolishing criminal governance.

Over 350 patriots gathered on a beautiful summer day in Maine to inform themselves of the unreported developments concerning 911 and to demand that their government investigate the events leading up to 911.

Sponsored by Big Medicine Productions, 911citizenswatch.org, "Bring Democracy Now! to Maine" Campaign, Maine Indy Media Center, Peace Action Maine and Seacoast Alliance for Democracy.

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the Atlantic Hall in Cape Porpoise, Kennebunkport, Maine.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 3, 2003

NANCY CHANG - DAVID COLE - MICHAEL AVERY

WAR ON TERRORISM OR ATTACK ON HUMAN RIGHTS?

Panel 1 of 4 Legal Overview of the Issues

Nancy Chang - Senior Litigation Attorney for the Center for Constitutional Rights David Cole - Georgetown University Law Professor and Legal Affairs Correspondent for The Nation Michael Avery - President of the National Lawyers Guild

Once in a great while, I have a chance to record a conference that blows my mind. This was one of them. Plenty of alternative, hidden history, chock full of antedotes and stories concerning John Ashcroft's "War on Americans' Rights" and yet, an uplifting social and political experience to encourage all Americans to keep up the fight. Radio Free Maine was only alternative news service to video and audio record this conference. Censorship Free Radio of WMBR (MIT)also audio recorded. These recordings are excellent education tools for peace and justice groups concerned about the loss of liberties in America.

This conference was organized and co-sponsored by the College of Public and Community Service at UMass Boston and the University of Massachusetts Human Rights Working Group (UMBHRWG).

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 3, 2003

NANCY MURRAY - MERRIE NAJIMY - AYESHA KAZMI - SOFFIYAH JILL ELIHAH - SUNAINA MAIRA

WAR ON TERRORISM OR ATTACK ON HUMAN RIGHTS?

Panel 2 of 4 Immigration Practices, Racial Profiling, Detention and Deportation

Nancy Murray - Director of the Massachusetts ACLU Bill of Rights Educational Project Merrie Najimy - President of the Arab-American Anti-Discrimination Committee Soffiyah Jill Elihah - Harvard Law Instructor and Attorney for Political Prisoners Sunaina Maira - UMass Amherst English Instructor and co-author of "Contours of the Heart: South Asians Map North America" Ayesha Kazmi - Islamic Students Association

Once in a great while, I have a chance to record a conference that blows my mind. This was one of them. Plenty of alternative, hidden history, chock full of antedotes and stories concerning John Ashcroft's "War on Americans' Rights" and yet, an uplifting social and political experience to encourage all Americans to keep up the fight. Radio Free Maine was only alternative news service to video and audio record this conference. Censorship Free Radio of WMBR (MIT)also audio recorded. These recordings are excellent education tools for peace and justice groups concerned about the loss of liberties in America.

This conference was organized and co-sponsored by the College of Public and Community Service at UMass Boston and the University of Massachusetts Human Rights Working Group (UMBHRWG).

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 3, 2003

WINSTON LANGLEY - CHIP BERLET - MATTHEW ROTHSCHILD - YAJU DHARMARAJAH - CLAY BENNETT - MIKE KONOPACKI

WAR ON TERRORISM OR ATTACK ON HUMAN RIGHTS?

Panel 3 of 4 The FBI, Surveillance and Government Secrecy

Winston Langley - Author of The Encyclopedia of Human Rights Issues Since 1945 Chip Berlet - Senior Analyst for Political Research Associates Matthew Rothschild - Editor of The Progressive Yaju Dharmarajah - Labor Organizer for SEIU/AFL-CIO and FBI Profiling Target The first 23 minutes of the video features Christian Science Monitor cartoonist Clay Bennett and labor cartoonist Mike Konopacki of Huck/Konopacki Labor Cartoons introducing the U.S. Patriot Art Show and discussing censorship of political cartoons.

Once in a great while, I have a chance to record a conference that blows my mind. This was one of them. Plenty of alternative, hidden history, chock full of antedotes and stories concerning John Ashcroft's "War on Americans' Rights" and yet, an uplifting social and political experience to encourage all Americans to keep up the fight. Radio Free Maine was only alternative news service to video and audio record this conference. Censorship Free Radio of WMBR (MIT)also audio recorded. These recordings are excellent education tools for peace and justice groups concerned about the loss of liberties in America.

This conference was organized and co-sponsored by the College of Public and Community Service at UMass Boston and the University of Massachusetts Human Rights Working Group (UMBHRWG).

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



May 3, 2003

CHUCK TURNER - MONAMI MAULIK - ABIRA ASHFAQ - NANCY TALANIAN - ISMAEL RAMIREZ-SOTO - JOSHUA ANYGEORGE

WAR ON TERRORISM OR ATTACK ON HUMAN RIGHTS?

Panel 4 of 4 Political Action

Chuck Turner - Member of the Boston City Council Monami Maulik - Founder and Organizer of DRUM (Desis Rising Up and Moving), a social justice organization for working-class South Asian immigrants Abira Ashfaq - Immigration Detention Attorney for CLINIC, Inc. Nancy Talanian - Director of the Bill of Rights Defense Committee Ismael Ramirez-Soto - Dean of UMass Boston College of Public and Community Service The first 17 minutes features a poetry reading by Joshua Anygeorge, a former political prisoner, refugee and poet from Sierra Leone.

Once in a great while, I have a chance to record a conference that blows my mind. This was one of them. Plenty of alternative, hidden history, chock full of antedotes and stories concerning John Ashcroft's "War on Americans' Rights" and yet, an uplifting social and political experience to encourage all Americans to keep up the fight. Radio Free Maine was only alternative news service to video and audio record this conference. Censorship Free Radio of WMBR (MIT)also audio recorded. These recordings are excellent education tools for peace and justice groups concerned about the loss of liberties in America.

This conference was organized and co-sponsored by the College of Public and Community Service at UMass Boston and the University of Massachusetts Human Rights Working Group (UMBHRWG).

Recorded by Roger Leisner at the University of Massachusetts at Boston.

Recorded on Hi8 Digital



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Catalog last updated 10/20/03. Contact Radio Free Maine directly for information on more recent recordings.